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Band Reunions: Is The Craze Here To Stay?

By Vasilis

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As passionate music fans, there are few things we dread more than the announcement that one of our favorite bands is calling it quits. It is a not-so-subtle reminder that nothing lasts forever and a moment that brings both sadness and reflection. Break-ups in the music world, like in real life, come in all shapes and sizes: there are bitter conflict-filled break-ups, friendly mutual break-ups, and some from bands that just agree their music has run its course and decide to go out on top. Some come as a surprise while others blindside the music world. There is usually a message thanking the fans before the band fades out and leaves everyone to ask “what’s next” for the members and this can often lead to discussions of the music’s legacy and place in history.

It’s only natural that music fans tend to experience the five stages of grief (denial, anger, bargaining, depression, acceptance) following a split. Bands can feel like a part of our family and some have profound emotional effects on us. Knowing that you will never get to hear a new song or see that band live is a painful realization that slowly dulls over time. However, the acceptance stage is quickly becoming a thing of the past as more and more bands are turning to reunions. As a result, fans have begun treating a hiatus or a break-up as a mere inconvenience that they will have to endure for a short period of time until the band decides, for whatever reason, to come back. Reunions can come about because of a genuine desire to recapture past glory, a yearning to reconnect with fans, or, more cynically, a desire to cash in on past success and a reemergence of the group’s status with fans. However, fans rarely care and are just happy to have their favorite bands back in their lives again.

The scene has been a hotbed of reunions as of late, as groups like Yellowcard, The Starting Line, The Get Up Kids, The Early November, and countless others have “gotten the band back together” to celebrate the anniversary of a classic album, release new material, or go on a short tour before returning back to the ranks of the broken up. Many of these bands announced their break-ups within the past half-decade, and the term “hiatus” has been used more prevalently to soften the blow and leave the door open for a return. The two biggest reunions belong to Blink-182 and Fall Out Boy, bands many believed were done for good. While not every reunion has been celebrated or met with unbridled enthusiasm, the comebacks have been treated well by fans and have shown other groups that an official break-up announcement doesn’t have to be the end and has only served to encourage bands to reform.

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This year has already seen its fair share of unlikely reunions. Pop punk favorites Midtown announced they would be performing at this year’s Skate & Surf Festival, their first show since calling it quits in 2005. Following the success of Cobra Starship, many figured Gabe Saporta would have no interest in reuniting his old band (in which he played bass and sang). Outkast, the hip hop duo behind the hit song “Hey Ya”, has made their way around various festivals as part of their much-publicized reunion. Strangest of all is the unusual Nirvana Brooklyn performances, in celebration of the group’s 2014 induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, which featured Dave Grohl, Krist Novoselic, Pat Smear, and an assortment of guest vocalists, including Joan Jett and Lorde, stepping in for the late Kurt Cobain.

Then this week, influential emo bands American Football and Mineral announced their respective reunions. American Football released their self-titled EP and LP in 1999, their only recorded pieces of music, but their plans to re-release their music in a 2xLP collection set through Polyvynl Records led the band to announce shows in Chicago and New York City. Following this announcing, Mineral, who released their albums in 1997 and 1998 and have not played a show in 17 years, announced a short tour with emo band Into It. Over It. Their reunions were met with intense interest despite the long time away. These announcements give fans who were not old enough in the 90’s a chance to see a band they never thought they would be able to and can even lead to new songs or old recordings being uncovered and released.

Still, it’s fair to ask “is a reunion really necessary”. Can a reunion actually harm a band’s legacy? A failed return with bad songs or weak, uninspired performances can taint the image a band may have previously held. American Football has always been the musical version of “Freaks & Geeks” to me. Their one album, like the cult classic’s beloved lone season, felt like a moment in time that was pure because it never went stale and never overstayed its welcome. Without a second season, Freaks & Geeks never had the opportunity to go downhill or ruin the greatness of its first season. American Football’s legacy has remained pristine because their Self-Titled album has built their legacy and kept it going. The constant fear is that successful shows may lead to new music that will seem more like a cash-grab than a genuine, inspired collection of music.

After so much time apart, it’s also fair to question how much the break has affected the group’s chemistry and how the band’s music has held up. Reunions can serve as a good litmus test to see where the music actually stands. While some choose to look down at reunions and criticize bands who don’t know when to say when, the facts show that reunions are generally pretty successful. Midtown and Outkast’s festival reunions have both been met with positivity, while both American Football and Mineral sold out their shows so quickly they had to resort to adding more. The New York City Saturday show and subsequent Friday show crashed Ticketweb because of the volume of visitors, causing a social media uproar and leading many frustrated fans to lament losing out on this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. The band went on to add a third Webster Hall show that Sunday, meaning that the band will have sold over 4,200 tickets when all is said and done.

The reunion craze has been booming because nostalgia is in such high demand. Now more than ever, we are engulfed by nostalgia, and bands are seizing the opportunity and they themselves are being subjected to these memories of the great times they with their bands. What ultimately attracts us to reunions is that they transport us back in time and elicit powerful memories. By going to see a band like Blink-182 perform, we remember that feeling of listening to them in the early 90’s and early 2000’s (whether you were in middle school, high school, or college) and it brings back these feelings. And this is not unique to the punk scene; classic rock legends like Led Zeppelin and Van Halen reunited in the 2000’s after over 20 years apart to play shows. Boy bands like Backstreet Boys and New Kids on the Block have gone on reunion tours, while N Sync and Destiny’s Child have taken the stage briefly to perform together. With so many groups nobody ever saw getting back together now reuniting, the possibilities are endless. Beloved broken up bands from Jawbreaker to Husker Du to The Replacements to The Smiths (though Morrissey has rejected this notion entirely) may one day perform again.

Reunions are never going to please everybody. For every fan that is thrilled to see their favorite group reform, there’s one that wants to remember the band for what they are and avoid seeing them tarnish their legacy. So the question to be asked is: when is enough enough? Is it okay for a band that has been gone for three or four years to come back? Should a band that’s been gone for more than 10 years stay away to preserve their legacy? In the case of American Football and Mineral, we won’t know the answer until they play their shows. But one thing is for sure: the reunion craze is not going away. For better or for worse, they remain extremely profitable and a big hit among fans. While some remain critical, crowds come out in droves, buy the new and the old albums, and celebrate the return of their favorite band. The great thing is that those who are happy to see the band reunite can embrace it, while the more jaded fan who wishes those bands stayed away can just ignore it and live in ignorant bliss while holding on to their memories. In this scenario, it’s a win-win for everyone, so there’s no harm in a band wanting to take a stroll down memory lane as long as they do it right.

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Top Five Music Stories That Defined 2013 For Me

by Vasilis

5. The Return of Justin Timberlake

I am not much of a fan of Justin Timberlake’s music, although he is hilarious and I appreciate how talented he is. However, to deny how big his return to music was would be extremely naïve. After stepping away from the music game to focus on his acting, the pop star returned with no warning and defined the pop music landscape by releasing two albums that set the bar high in terms of sale and performance. Additionally, his song “Suit & Tie” was everywhere, from beer commercials to sporting events to late night shows, and “Mirrors” followed suit with big-time radio play. To top it off, his collaboration with hip hop mogul Jay-Z “Suit & Tie” and “Holy Grail” and their collaboration on their summer stadium tour made waves and sold incredibly well, even selling out two Yankee Stadium shows. The subsequent solo headlining tour he embarked was also a huge success, and with another headlining tour taking place early next year, it’s safe to say Justin Timberlake’s return to music is nowhere near finished.

4. Fall Out Boy Reunite to “Save Rock and Roll”

While Justin Timberlake’s return was flashier, Fall Out Boy’s meant more to me. After attending their “final” show at Madison Square Garden supporting Blink-182 in 2009, I was not sure I’d ever see them back together again. Whispers began early on that the band should and would reunite to honor the 10-year anniversary of their beloved pop punk masterpiece Take This To Your Grave, but the band’s members vehemently denied any plans, even up to a day before the announcement. Then, with one simple post, the pop punk world turned upside down: Not only was Fall Out Boy back, but they already had a new album recorded, a new single to release, three small club shows planned for Chicago, New York, and Los Angeles, and a small venue tour set for the spring. The most startling aspect of the return was the band doing everything under complete cover of darkness; no news leaked during the process, making the announcement that much more startling. With their new album Save Rock and Roll and the image of the band burning Take This To Your Grave, it was clear they had no interest of returning to their pop punk roots to appease fans, instead recording the album they wanted to. Their first single “My Songs Know What You Did In the Dark (Light ‘Em Up)” was hugely successful and led to various television and festival performances, showing the group’s propensity for writing hook-soaked pop/rock tunes had only improved and their name was bigger than ever. 2013 was a year of returns and exits in music, but the biggest for me was the re-emergence of Fall Out Boy.

3. Parting is Such Sweet Sorrow

With every happy return came a sad goodbye in 2013, which featured some of my favorite members leaving or being forced out of some of my favorite bands. Tony Thaxton, citing the need to step away from life on the road, quit his role as Motion City Soundtrack drummer after being with the band since their debut 2003 album I Am the Movie. Even more startling was the announcement that founding Sum 41 member and drummer Steve Jocz was departing after 17 years, leaving vocalist Deryck Whibley the only remaining founding member. While people have speculated that Deryck’s potential substance abuse problems and the constant show cancellations were the cause, Jocz gave no further reason. Rounding out the drummers was the announcement that Say Anything drummer Coby Linder was departing, leaving singer-songwriter Max Bemis as the group’s only non-live member (I’m cheating a bit on this one, as Coby made the announcement on December 29, 2012). On the ska side, trombonist Dan Regan left Reel Big Fish after a startling 20 years with the band, leaving singer/guitarist and group founder Aaron Barrett as the only member who has been with the band since the ‘90s. Finally, the news recently came out that New Found Glory had essentially kicked out backing guitarist and primary lyricist Steve Klein, sending ripples through the pop punk community and causing people to question the band’s motives and wonder about any potential schism between them. The band was known as a tight-knit group of friends, having had the same lineup since forming in 1997. This, paired with the fact that the split did not seem mutual, make this the most shocking of all.

2. The Fall of Ian Watkins

Cherie and I have said all we could about this story in our post, but this story completely changed the face of the rock world in 2013. The details were so horrifying, so disturbing that it made people wonder aloud how any man could think these actions up and caused people to completely discard the entire band’s catalog. The world of music is full of heroes and villains, but Ian Watkins arose as the most universally hated figure; people cursed his existence and wished him hell in his jail cell. In a strange way, the story united many music fans from all over in their contempt and hate for Ian Watkins. While the story has recently begun winding down with his guilty plea, the shock of this story has still not completely worn off.

1. Happy Ten-iversary!

Strangely enough, the thing I will remember most about 2013 was how incredible 2003 was. No year defined “the scene” (meaning the world of pop punk, emo, alternative, pop/rock, etc.) more than 2003; the sheer amount of ground-breaking, life-changing albums that came out that year is unrivaled, and the bands showed their appreciation by going on a run of 10-year anniversary tours. Yellowcard paid homage to Ocean Avenue with a recorded rendition of the album and an acoustic tour, Story of the Year honored Page Avenue by performing it in its entirety on the “Scream it Like You Mean It” tour, Finch toured for What It Is To Burn, The Early November announced two special December shows in Philadelphia and New York to perform The Room’s Too Cold, Death Cab For Cutie played Transatlanticism on a short run of dates earlier this year and Blink-182 performed Blink-182 at a 5-show Los Angeles residency. Well-known Long Island recluses Brand New even shocked fans by performing the genre-defining Deja Entendu on a short run of dates earlier this year. On top of that, both New Found Glory and Taking Back Sunday continued their 2012 run of ten-year tours for Sticks and Stones and Tell All Your Friends, respectively. All that nostalgic firepower doesn’t even include Thrice (The Artist in the Ambulance), Thursday (War all the Time), AFI (Sing the Sorrow), Fall Out Boy (Take This To Your Grave), The Format (Interventions and Lullabies), Matchbook Romance (Stories and Alibis), Something Corporate (North), Coheed and Cambria (In Keeping Secrets…), The Ataris (So Long Astoria), MxPx (Before Everything and After), Less than Jake (Anthem), The Postal Service (Give Up), Saves the Day (In Reverie), and… well, you get the picture. I even ended up leaving a bunch of albums off this list that also came from the scene. Looking back at 2003 through the nostalgia-filled 2013 glasses, I came to realize how many bands helped shape the current genre that I love, and even though at the time I didn’t pay attention it made me that much more grateful that these bands and albums exist.

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